PDM OFFICIAL

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     Play Detroit Music is an epic step towards showcasing the plethora of talent that derives from Detroit's rich history in the mainstream & underground music scene. PDM is geared to highlight Detroit's influence on every genre of music. From the musical geniuses of Motown, to the birthplace of Techno, Detroit is a quiet giant behind the music scene, and PDM is the digital home for Detroit's music profile.

INTERVIEWEE: Andre Terrell, “The Cool DJ”
INTERVIEWER: Jessica L.A. Pipkins

1. How did you start your career in music?

I've always wanted to DJ. I learned how to beatmatch from my big cousin when I was about 15 or 16. However, my career as a DJ happened suddenly and in some way by accident. As a marketing professional, I wanted to offer my retail clients the option to host in-store promotions that would include DJs. Every DJ that I reached out to wanted to charge me more than what I was able to charge the client. I think that really reinvigorated my interest and desire to DJ. I thought to myself I'll get some equipment and do it myself. Soon after people heard me play I got booked to the DJ for the Concert of Colors. A few years later I'm...

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INTERVIEWEE: Andre Terrell, “The Cool DJ”
INTERVIEWER: Jessica L.A. Pipkins

1. How did you start your career in music?

I've always wanted to DJ. I learned how to beatmatch from my big cousin when I was about 15 or 16. However, my career as a DJ happened suddenly and in some way by accident. As a marketing professional, I wanted to offer my retail clients the option to host in-store promotions that would include DJs. Every DJ that I reached out to wanted to charge me more than what I was able to charge the client. I think that really reinvigorated my interest and desire to DJ. I thought to myself I'll get some equipment and do it myself. Soon after people heard me play I got booked to the DJ for the Concert of Colors. A few years later I'm still banging.

2. Where do you get creative inspiration? Are there any DJs or artists in particular that inspire you in your craft?

I'm a lover of music. I get inspiration from John Sebastian Bach to Dwele. DJ's that I draw inspiration from include: Detroit’s own DJ Emmett, Jazzy Jeff, and Karizma to name a few.

3. What do you see in the future of music in Detroit? How do you see the house music scene evolving for Detroit?

I see the future of music in Detroit becoming more diverse. Right now, like the city it's really segregated. Most of the young cats don't listen to house music, and I think there's a lot of music that the older house heads are missing out on. I think that's because some of the house DJs haven't done much to grow the culture. A lot of them have been able to maintain and develop a brand for over 30 years, yet they haven't brought on any new fans. It is my goal as a house music DJ and a DJ in general to bridge the gap and cross cultures.

4. What made you join the #PLAYDETROITMUSIC movement?

There's a saying "If something is rolling, roll with it or get rolled up under it." I consider myself a prodigal son of Detroit, and I love music. So, if there's a movement involving the two I damn sure better be a part of it.

5. Tell us about what’s next for you.

I'm looking for sponsors for a concept that I will be taking on a national tour. I also plan on producing some tracks this summer.

6. How can people connect with you online?

You can find me on Instagram and Facebook @andreterrellthecooldj, for booking and info visit www.thecooldj.com. You can also stay in the loop with my music on The Street Pass app.

7. Is there advice you want to give to DJs in Detroit?

The advice I would give to DJs in Detroit is to explore more music and take risks (musically).

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INTERVIEWEE: Mahogany Jones
INTERVIEWER: Jessica L.A. Pipkins

1. How did you start your career in music?

I believe my music career began when I first fell in love with words and stories as a child. Once I was brave enough to embrace that I wanted to be a lyricist and transitioned from solely being a spoken word artist to being a rapper, I was given the opportunity to compete on a show that used to be on BET called 106 and Park Freestyle Friday. I prayed hard and walked away as a four-time undefeated champion. After this experience, I knew that I wanted to create albums of my own and began to do so with long time producer and business partner Ronald Lee, Jr. with his company What's the Irony back in 2002.

2. Where do you get creative...

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INTERVIEWEE: Mahogany Jones
INTERVIEWER: Jessica L.A. Pipkins

1. How did you start your career in music?

I believe my music career began when I first fell in love with words and stories as a child. Once I was brave enough to embrace that I wanted to be a lyricist and transitioned from solely being a spoken word artist to being a rapper, I was given the opportunity to compete on a show that used to be on BET called 106 and Park Freestyle Friday. I prayed hard and walked away as a four-time undefeated champion. After this experience, I knew that I wanted to create albums of my own and began to do so with long time producer and business partner Ronald Lee, Jr. with his company What's the Irony back in 2002.

2. Where do you get creative inspiration? Are there any artists or anything in particular that inspires you in your craft?

I get my inspiration from my relationship with God, love, people, my life experiences, and other genres of music. It's really difficult to list how many artists have influenced my craft. However, the artists that have inspired me the most are those that are vulnerable, those who you can hear and see, feel and taste - you can almost touch the blood, sweat and tears of them refining their craft. Ultimately the leading artists that allow you to feel their love and passion for people - Stevie Wonder, Mos Def, Erykah Badu, Nina Simone, Common, Lauryn Hill, Tracey Chapman, Bjork among many others.

3. What do you see in the future of music in Detroit? How do you see the music scene evolving for Detroit artists?

I think Detroit has always been known for its high-quality of musicianship and innovation. I think that the more Detroit becomes a hub of culture, the more the music that comes from Detroit will evolve. I believe with things like D I M E and assembly sound, and more collectives collaborating the possibilities are endless.

4. What made you join the #PLAYDETROITMUSIC movement?

I love and appreciate how Play Detroit Music is doing the work to expose the greatness and brilliance of all that the city and its musicians have to offer.

5. Tell us about what’s next for you.

I currently am working on a deluxe version of my last release SugarWater. I am also working with Trumpetor, composer, and fellow Kresky Fellowship Awardee Kris Johnson, Sasha Lashperko, and Lauren Johnson to create a live album.

6. How can people connect with you online?

www.mahoganyjones.com
IG-@mahoganyjonz
FB-MahoganyJonz
twitter-@mahoganyjonez

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INTERVIEWEE: Sigidy
INTERVIEWER: Jessica L.A. Pipkins

1. How did you start your career in music?

I started my career in music around 2010 when around age 19, backed by a previous wave of mixtapes on Datpiff, from years before that led into releasing a plethora of EP’s teasing to that summer where the debut album was released. After the release, a buzz ensued into industry conversations that eventually led to a feature in XXL Magazine’s The Break online in the end of the summer. Then I headed to school at Northern Kentucky University. I was in the actual print magazine that following fall. Being mentioned within industry circles landed me opportunities to open for artists like Hopsin, OG Maco, and John Connor which gave me lots of experience ...

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INTERVIEWEE: Sigidy
INTERVIEWER: Jessica L.A. Pipkins

1. How did you start your career in music?

I started my career in music around 2010 when around age 19, backed by a previous wave of mixtapes on Datpiff, from years before that led into releasing a plethora of EP’s teasing to that summer where the debut album was released. After the release, a buzz ensued into industry conversations that eventually led to a feature in XXL Magazine’s The Break online in the end of the summer. Then I headed to school at Northern Kentucky University. I was in the actual print magazine that following fall. Being mentioned within industry circles landed me opportunities to open for artists like Hopsin, OG Maco, and John Connor which gave me lots of experience and exposure to people early on.

2. Where do you get creative inspiration? Are there any artists or anything in particular that inspires you in your craft?

I find creative inspiration from many things, from the aesthetic of a serene neighborhood or the spirit of the straight hood, to the vintage 70’s Brazilian B films, and the classic hip hop I grew up on as a millennial out here.

3. What do you see in the future of music in Detroit? How do you see the music scene evolving for Detroit artists?

I see Detroit as becoming further established and recognized as a modern day Motown for rap currently. A Lot of the biggest artists out right now currently are and have been from Detroit, and they’re graciously giving back in their respective ways. It only inspires and encourages the youth to channel into the craft earlier, really fostering a future artistic community within the city that will build on the dope culture of Detroit music from the underground and up. I see the scene evolving for Detroit artists in the honesty of the music. Some of the music may be exaggerated, but the spirit of the song carries to a mass audience that lives on the internet that will value those recordings for a lifetime, and to think it just came right from your backyard.

4. What made you join the #PLAYDETROITMUSIC movement?

My main man Paul Patterson referred me. He informed me somewhat of what you guys are about, and it’s love this way from Ypsilanti. *throws peace sign up*

5. Tell us about what’s next for you.

I’m currently kicking off this next wave of music. I’m about to embark on a mixtape-series run for the streets just to heat people up for more. It’s entitled The Flood, and the same cutting edge sound we’re known for is all there.

6. How can people connect with you on social media? Do you have a website or place where people can hear your music?

I’m on all social media at @sigidy34, and I do not have snapchat. If you google “sigidy” some classics will pop up, but if you head over to soundcloud.com/sigidy you’ll get more of a real taste of my versatility.

7. Is there advice you want to give to artists in Detroit?

Invest your time and your money into solely yourself, and if other people approach you be smart about it and behave timeless.

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